• Law,  Old Testament

    The Sabbath for Today

    It is a fitting time (coming on the heals of Labor Day) to talk about the Sabbath and its relationship to Christians. The issue of whether or not Christians should work on the Sabbath (usually applied to Sunday) is alive and well in our churches. How are we, as New Testament Christians, to think of the Sabbath? The Sabbath as a day of rest.

  • Law,  Old Testament

    Summary of the Ten Commandments

    Because I have written quite a few posts on the subject of the Old Testament Law, and more specifically the Ten Commandments, this post will serve as a summary of these posts. The reader who is interested in the Ten Commandments or the Law may find the following posts interesting. The OT Law in Its Narrative Context This post was an analysis of the Law as it appears in the Pentateuch. Oftentimes we miss some of the significant applications of the Law because we neglect the context in which it occurs. Unsurprisingly, the narrative context of the Law becomes very important to interpretation and understanding. The Purpose of the Old Testament Law In this post we discuss the overall purpose of the Law. We discuss how some people have wrongly attributed other purposes to the Law. Ultimately, the Law should be viewed as a reflection of God’s character, and insight…

  • Law,  Old Testament

    You Shall Not Covet (Commandment #10)

    You shall not covet your neighbor’s house; you shall not covet your neighbor’s wife or his male servant or his female servant or his ox or his donkey or anything that belongs to your neighbor (Exod 20:17) You shall not covet your neighbor’s wife, and you shall not desire your neighbor’s house, his field or his male servant or his female servant, his ox or his donkey or anything that belongs to your neighbor (Deut 5:21) It is interesting that other ancient Near Eastern civilizations did not have laws prohibiting an attitude like covetousness. There were many laws prohibiting wrongful action, but none that prohibited desiring something that was prohibited. Covetousness can be thought of as internal desire for something forbidden. It is not the action that is in view in the tenth commandment, but the implicit desire for what does not belong to you. Interestingly, Exodus 20 uses the…